Archive for Category: "Gardening Tips"

The Astrology of the Garden

The Astrology of the Garden

Even gardeners in the coldest part of the country can get a pea in the ground now, but the conditions in which it has to grow may not be ideal.  It’s the gardeners that “plant-by-the-moon” that have the best results it seems. 

Contain those Containers

Contain those Containers

  Are your containers ready for the very frigid Winter months ahead?  If you are in most of the U.S. you only have a couple of weeks before it starts getting really cold!  If your pots and containers aren’t ready for freezing temperatures they might need to be mulched and top mulching is useless since [&hellip

Bulb Brain

Bulb Brain

Bulbs exhaust their nutrients when they bloom.  To get your bulbs to bloom again they need to replenish their systems.  So, don’t trim the ugly dried blooms from the plant, no matter how unattractive.  They are there for a reason.  Those old, ugly blooms and leaves are there to carry on the photosynthesis process.  Once [&hellip

Buying your Seeds

It’s time to buy your seeds for the coming year. This is the fun part- so here is a great tip to think about before you start flipping through all of those catalogs. Try to buy seeds that originated from the country in which you live. America, for instance, has a variety of companies that [&hellip

Salt in the Winter!

Salt devastates plants! So don’t throw salt down to accelerate ice thaw on your driveway or steps, particularly if they are near by beds or borders. Salt is most dangerous in late Fall and late Winter because feeder roots of your plants are not fully dormant and it can kill them. Use an alternative such [&hellip

Tomato Clinic

* If your tomato plants leaves are turning purplish, it might have phosphorus deficiency. Carefully work in some bone meal around the plant. * If your tomato plant has green-blue curled leaves and few blossoms it might need copper. Work in a small amount of manure compost, saw dust, or grass clippings to remedy. * [&hellip

Onions

Onions

Instead of tossing onion skins in the compost heap, spread them over your cucumber patch.  The scent will disorient squash bugs and striped cucumber beetles so they wont eat your crop!    In fact, don’t toss them in your compost pile at all.  Worms hate onions.  The worms, which are great for compost, will actually crawl out [&hellip