Archive for October, 2008

The U.S. Energy Conundrum: Rising oil prices have forced Americans to consider energy alternatives – including drilling on U.S. soil.

The U.S. Energy Conundrum: Rising oil prices have forced Americans to consider energy alternatives – including drilling on U.S. soil.

By Alix J. Shutello In June, U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman stood looking up at the Saudi King Abdullah. The king sat perched on a dais in the middle of a palatial conference room with marble walls and glittering chandeliers. Bodman was pleading to the King to produce more oil while claiming that petroleum prices [&hellip

Vitamin A

Vitamin A

What is Vitamin A? Vitamin A, also known as retinol, is another one of those fat soluble vitamins that cannot be made by the human body. For those of you who did not read the last issue’s article, fat soluble means that it can dissolve in fat and, as Americans, we usually have no shortage [&hellip

Bees

Bees

Until recently, most of us have been fairly unaware of bees and their activities, with the possible exception of occasionally being concerned that we might be stung by a nearby bee. With the rise of Colony Collapse Disorder, suddenly bees are regularly in the news. What do we know about these creatures and why are [&hellip

Carrots (Daucus Carota)

Carrots (Daucus Carota)

  The favorite food of Bugs Bunny, this biennial plant gets its name from the French word carotte or Latin word Carota. Carrots belong to the Umbelliferae family along with parsnips, cumin, dill and fennel, which all have umbrella-like flower clusters

STOP EATING PROCESSED, NONORGANIC RED MEAT!

STOP EATING PROCESSED, NONORGANIC RED MEAT!

Yoga Bean Magazine and Studios just recently showed a screening of the movie “King Corn” at our studio in Pennsylvania. This is a documentary about two graduate students that, after getting samples of their hair broken down into its molecular components and finding out it was mostly made up of corn, decide to rent an [&hellip

Poison Sumac in New Jersey and Hiroshima

Poison Sumac in New Jersey and Hiroshima

 Poison sumac wasn’t a plant that I was wary of, or even familiar with, until one year ago, despite a childhood spent playing in the forests, rivers and weeds of New Jersey countryside

He wasn’t ready.

He wasn’t ready.

Once again I am sitting here, in a café, pressing on the keys of my laptop in total disbelief that I am again writing in my magazine’s opening article about one of my pets. This time it is Petro. I am very sad to report that my lovely and courageous Petro, my almost 16 year [&hellip